Slavery

 The End of Slavery 

  High School Social Studies

CORE 21; UNIT PLANNING WORKSHEET

Name: Jason Deehan

1. Unit topic:

The End of Slavery in the United States

2. Duration of Unit:

Three weeks

3. Topic ideas:  This can be a list or a graphic organizer.

·      Why does slavery exist? - The economics of slavery

·      Treatment of slaves

·      Slave states vs Free states

·      The Dred Scott case

·      The election of 1860

·      Civil War – comparing the two sides

·      Civil War – significant battles, events and individuals

·      End of the War/Lincoln Assassination

·      Reconstruction

4. Standards: These will come either your own state standards or from the Common Core Standards. Include:

·      Twenty-first century skills and standards

-       Problem solving

-       Creativity

-       Analytic thinking

-       Collaboration

-       Communication

-       Ethics, flexibility, action, and accountability

·      Content Standards

-       Connections and Conflicts

-       Government

-       Analyzes historical documents

-       Presents a position in oral or written form and supports with evidence

5. Objectives: Write your objectives for student mastery clearly using the verbs of Bloom’s taxonomy such as analyze, create etc. 

·      Why does slavery exist? - The economics of slavery

-       Students will analyze the economic output/income of slave-owning states

-       Students will draw conclusions about the income generated and the reluctance to end slavery

·      Treatment of slaves

-       Students will explore and understand how slaves lived – their housing, their clothing, the treatment of families, and punishments

·      Slave states vs Free states

-       Students will analyze and appraise the congressional process for bringing new states into the Union

-       Students will assess the process means in terms of ending versus prolonging the practice of slavery

·      The Dred Scott case

-       Students will examine the Dred Scott situation and predict how the Supreme Court will rule

-       Students will analyze the court’s decision and explore the long-term impact of the decision on the nation and in the life of both free and enslaved African-Americans

·      The election of 1860

-       Students will analyze the presidential election of 1860

-       Students will determine the importance of the contest in the context of ending slavery

-       Students will assess the election parties and predict the outcome of the voting

-       Students will examine Lincoln’s use of Executive Order to pass the Emancipation Proclamation

-       Students will analyze and appraise the actual Emancipation Proclamation provisions, measuring its purpose/effectiveness versus its wording

-       Students will create a version of the Emancipation Proclamation that is designed to be more effective than the original

·      Civil War – comparing the two sides

-       Students will examine the resource advantages and disadvantages of the Union and Confederate societies

-       Students will determine, based on their exploration, who should win the upcoming struggle

·      Civil War – significant battles, events and individuals

-       Students will know battles, events and individuals from the Civil War

-       Students will understand the significance of the above and their contributions to the outcome of the conflict

·      End of the War/Lincoln Assassination

-       Students will explore the end of the Civil War and make connections from that end to the earlier exploration of advantages and disadvantages

-       Students will explore the events surrounding the assassination of President Lincoln, including the motives of the assassin and the possible link to Lincoln’s actions (use of executive orders, suspension of habeas corpus, etc.)

-       Students will predict the impact of this murder

·      Reconstruction

-       Students will analyze the actions taken after the war to end slavery and ensure equality/citizenship/fair treatment for former slaves

-       Students will, using modern news stories concerning the lives of African Americans, measure the effectiveness of the reconstruction efforts

6.  Have students discuss what they will be doing and describe what they will be learning in this unit.

This step will occur throughout the unit. Each class will begin with a Daily Quiz – a warm-up activity based on asking retention and understanding questions about our activities in the previous class. Taking up the quizzes will provide an opportunity for group discussions about the learning.

7.  How will you assess your students?

Assessment will occur in several ways:

Formative Assessment

Students will be regularly assessed to determine understanding. Small activities, daily quizzes, and observation will be employed.

Summative Assessment                                                                                                       

Students will be formally assessed at the end of the unit using a culminating project.

8. Design all assessments prior to beginning instruction—this is the heart of backward design.   This has to be carefully thought out.

·      Why does slavery exist? - The economics of slavery

·      Treatment of slaves

Assessment – students will demonstrate their understanding of slavery through a journal-writing activity. Students will take the role of an abolitionist who visits a slave plantation. They will write an entry into their journal about the practice of slavery and the treatment of slaves they witness during their visit.

Rubric

Criteria

Spectrum of Achievement

(0 did not meet expectations

Middle  – met expectations with some exceptions or omissions

Highest number – met all expectations fully)

Content - Students draw accurate conclusions about the reluctance to end slavery. Students can explain how slaves lived in a detailed and accurate manner.

 0    1     2     3     4     5    6    7    8    9    10

Conventions – journal is free of spelling, grammar, punctuation errors.

 0    1     2     3     4     5

Voice & Word Choice – journal feels authentic and historical.

0    1     2     3     4     5

Total                 

                      /20

·      Slave states vs Free states

·      The Dred Scott case

·      The election of 1860

Assessment – students will demonstrate their understanding of the federal government’s various actions in terms of attempting to end/prolong slavery. Students will choose one branch of government (Legislative, Judicial or Executive) and write a report outlining what the actions of this branch were, appraising the performance in terms of how it contributed to a consensus-based solution to slavery, and finally outline their own suggestion in terms of a solution.

Rubric

Criteria

Spectrum of Achievement

(0 did not meet expectations

Middle  – met expectations with some exceptions or omissions

Highest number – met all expectations fully)

Content – Student demonstrates a complete and accurate understanding of the actions of the 3 branches of the federal government.

 0    1     2     3     4     5    6    7    8    9    10

Solution – Student developed a solution to the problem that is realistic, well-defined, and yet considers and respects the perspective of all stake holders.

 0    1     2     3     4     5    6    7    8    9    10

Conventions – work is free of spelling, grammar, punctuation errors.

 0    1     2     3     4     5

Total                 

                      /25

·      Civil War – comparing the two sides

Assessment - Students will create recruitment posters for either the Confederate or Union armies, using information outlined in the above comparison study

Rubric

Criteria

Spectrum of Achievement

(0 did not meet expectations

Middle  – met expectations with some exceptions or omissions

Highest number – met all expectations fully)

Information – Poster features information that is historically accurate and rich in details

 0    1     2     3     4     5   

Conventions – Poster is free of spelling, grammar, punctuation errors.

 0    1     2     3     4     5

Presentation – Poster is colorful, eye-catching, and clearly and effectively communicates the message.

0    1     2     3     4     5

Total                 

                      /15

·      Civil War – significant battles, events and individuals

·      End of the War/Lincoln Assassination

Assessment – students will explore and analyze the actions of Lincoln in terms of ending slavery and running the war effort as Commander-in-Chief. Students will study a number of statements about the actions and words of Lincoln and determine the points of view of the writers. Then, students will write a paper about the actions of Lincoln and whether or not these actions overstepped the role/rules of the office of president.

Rubric:

Criteria

Spectrum of Achievement

(0 did not meet expectations

Middle  – met expectations with some exceptions or omissions

Highest number – met all expectations fully)

Ideas – Paper clearly presents the student’s ideas and the ideas are strongly supported by evidence and examples from the information provided.

 0    1     2     3     4     5    6    7    8    9    10

Organization – ideas and arguments are presented in a logical manner and are clearly connected together.

0    1     2     3     4     5    6    7    8    9    10

Conventions – Paper is free of spelling, grammar, punctuation errors.

 0    1     2     3     4     5

Total                 

                      /25

·      Reconstruction

Assessment – students will read newspaper stories about modern African-American experiences. Then, students will read articles about the push for reparations. Students will write a report about reparations and whether or not they are in favor of reparations for the descendants of African American slaves.

Rubric:

Criteria

Spectrum of Achievement

(0 did not meet expectations

Middle  – met expectations with some exceptions or omissions

Highest number – met all expectations fully)

Ideas – Paper clearly presents the student’s argument and the ideas are strongly supported by evidence and examples from the information provided.

 0    1     2     3     4     5    6    7    8    9    10

Organization – ideas and arguments are presented in a logical manner and are clearly connected together.

0    1     2     3     4     5    6    7    8    9    10

Conventions – Paper is free of spelling, grammar, punctuation errors.

 0    1     2     3     4     5

Total                 

                      /25

9. Design rubrics for your assessments for all of the concepts and standards you will be working on. 

See above.

10. Clearly work out and share your unit’s essential questions.

Essential Questions:

-       What is slavery?

-       Why was it so difficult for the United States to end slavery?

-       What role did the major branches of government play in the struggle to end slavery?

-       Did President Lincoln follow the rules of the Executive Branch, as laid out in the US Constitution, in his actions on slavery?

-       Was a war to solve this issue inevitable?

-       Was Lincoln a potential danger or a hero?

-       Should the descendants of African American slaves be paid reparations?

11. If you are working on a problem or project based unit (both are known as PBL)

design out your entry activity.

12. If you are working on a PBL, clearly work out your statements of the problem to be solved.

13.  Plan your anticipated sequence of instruction for the unit.

The sequence is as stated above:

·      Why does slavery exist? - The economics of slavery

·      Treatment of slaves

·      Slave states vs Free states

·      The Dred Scott case

·      The election of 1860

·      Civil War – comparing the two sides

·      Civil War – significant battles, events and individuals

·      End of the War/Lincoln Assassination

·      Reconstruction

14.  What will you have to differentiate?

New vocabulary will have to be gone over to ensure understanding.

Historical documents, will have to be scaffolded appropriately as the content and language will be difficult for many students.

Writing assignments may require certain students to work on laptop, if they have difficulty with a pen and paper.

15.  Anticipate potential problems.

In an international setting, such as my current school, a major problem is relevance. Issues, even those as important and long-reaching as slavery, are not as significant for people in other nations. They have their own issues and struggles and may not be as interested/connected to US struggles, as universal as they may appear. Without this relevancy, it is difficult for the teacher to generate emotion or passion in the student.

16. Check the level of rigor.

The assessment focuses on the higher level components of Bloom’s Taxonomy, such as Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating, and Creating. This makes the work that much more rigorous than the mere memorization and regurgitation of facts.

17.  What instructional tools do you need?

-       Emancipation Proclamation

-       US Constitution

-       journal exemplars

-       poster exemplars,

-       DVD – Killing Lincoln, various

18.   What vocabulary do you have to teach?

Vocabulary

Slavery

Executive order

Abolition

Secession

Emancipation

Civil war

Assassinate

Tyrant 

Missouri compromise

Reparations

Recruitment

19.   If you are working on a PBL students will have to make a final presentation. Plan your audience.